EastBay Today

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Posted June 15, 2016

Thousands Graduate from Cal State East Bay

Two honorary degrees were also awarded at the June 11-12 commencement ceremonies

Families and friends gathered this past weekend to celebrate Cal State East Bay’s 56th annual graduation. Thousands of students participated in commencement ceremonies held at both the Hayward and Concord campuses June 11 and 12.

In addition, CSUEB awarded two honorary degrees. One was presented to Yoji Unoki, chairman and CEO of the Fukuoka Institute of Technology in Fukuoka, Japan, and the other to Evelyn Dilsaver, a CSUEB graduate (B.S. ‘77) and former CEO of Charles Schwab Investment Management.

University President Leroy M. Morishita welcomed participants and their families to the ceremonies, and told students they would go on to create a “better, socially just, and sustainable world.”

Students this year represented a wide range of ages, from 20 to 69, and according to Morishita, are a diverse multicultural community of peers, many of whom speak English as a second, third, fourth or even fifth language.

The average age of graduates receiving their masters, doctorate or credential degrees was 32 while the average age of students receiving their bachelor’s degrees was 27.

“This year, Cal State East Bay will graduate more than 4,500 highly-educated, well-prepared individuals who will comprise the workforce of the 21st century,” Morishita told the crowd. “We have prepared you to be the learned individuals that employers and graduate schools will embrace to create a future that we have yet to imagine.” 

The president also encouraged students to follow their passions, dream big, and in everything, seek to make a difference.

“Through decisions you make in your professional and personal life, you have the ability to affect the lives of people …” he said. “Wherever the future takes you, with your Pioneer pride, your accomplishments, your passion and joy, you can help create a more socially just and equitable world.”

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